Myroslav Skoryk
composer

Biography:

Born in L'viv (then Poland, now Ukraine) on July 13, 1938. He came from an educated Ukrainian family (his grandmother was a sister of an eminent opera singer Solomea Krushelnyts'ka). He began learning music at music school in L'viv in 1945. In 1947 the Skoryks were repressed on political grounds and deported to Siberia. After J.Stalin's death they were allowed to return to L'viv, where he studied at the L'viv State V.Lysenko Conservatoire (now L'viv Music Academy) under Professors Stanislav Ljudkevych, Roman Simovych and Adam Soltys (composition class of A.Soltys, music history and theory class of S.Ljudkevych) in 1955-1960.
1960-1963 he made his post-graduated studies in composition at the Moscow State P.I.Tchaikovsky Conservatoire with Prof. D.Kabalevsky.
Since 1963 he has lectured at L'viv Conservatoire and since 1966 at Kiev State P.I.Tchaikovsky Conservatoire (now National Music Academy of Ukraine), lecturing music theory and composition (since 1971 as a Docent, since 1985 as a Professor). He has taught a number of well-known composers.
His output includes various musical genres: an opera, a ballet, a “Requiem”, concertos (1 for orchestra, 1 for cello with orchestra, 3 piano concertos and 2 violin ones), pieces for orchestra, various ensembles, solo piano etc. (in particular, 7 partitas for various instrumentations); music to numerous films and theatre plays; jazz and popular music.
He edited Ukrainian classic operas “Na Rusalchyn Velykden'” by Mykola Leontovych, “Kupalo” by Anatol' Vakhnjanyn, “Roksoljana” by Denys Sichyns'kyj.
Stylistically he has continued traditions of the L'viv composers' school, organically united with various primary genres; he has given an individual modern vision of the Ukrainian, especially Carpathian folklore, L'viv urban and salon music as well as contemporary popular music, first of all jazz.
His works have been regularly performed in Ukraine, in other countries former Soviet republics, in Germany, France, Austria, the Netherlands, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, Great Britain as well as in the USA, Canada and Australia. He has often performed his own works as conductor and pianist.
PhD in musicology (1967). The author of the monographies “S.Prokofiev's Modal System” (Kiev, “Muzychna Ukrajina”, 1969), and “Structure and Expressiveness of Accordics in the 20th-Century Music” (Kiev, “Muzychna Ukrajina”, 1984).
He was awarded many titles and awards: Honoured in Arts of Ukraine (1969), People's Artist of Ukraine (1988), Ukrainian Republic Komsomol M.Ostrovsky Prize (1968), Ukrainian State (now National) T.Shevchenko Prize (1987), “Sign of Honour” Soviet Order (1971), and Ukrainian President's “For Merits” Orden (3rd degree, 1998).
Member of the Ukrainian Composers' Union and its Secretary (1968-), Head of the Board of the L'viv Branch (1988-).

Works:

2001 "Moses" ("Mojsej"), opera after I.Franko (in Ukrainian) (prod.: L'viv, 2002)
1998
Partita no.7 for wind quintet
1996
Partita no.6 for string quartet
1994
"A-RI-A" for cello (or violin) and piano
1991
Sonata no.2 for violin and piano
1984
Concerto for cello and symphony orchestra
1982
Concerto no.2 for piano and symphony orchestra
1979
Toccata for piano
1978
"Harlequin's Songs" ("Pisni Arlekina"), children's musical (prod.: Kiev, 1978)
1977
Concerto no.1 for piano and symphony orchestra
1977
"Na Rusalchyn Velykden'" ("At the Rusalkas' Easter"), one-act opera, achieving, editing "nd orchestration M.Leontovych (prod.: Kiev, 1977)
1975
Partita no.5, cycle of pieces for piano
1974
Partita no.4 for symphony orchestra
1974
Partita no.3 for string orchestra (version: for sting quartet)
1974
"Try ukrajins'ki vesil'ni pisni" ("Three Ukrainian Wedding Songs") for voice and symphony orchestra
1973
Suite from the music to play "Kaminnyj hospodar" ("Stone Host") by Lesja Ukrajinka for symphony orchestra
1973
Three Fantasies from L'viv Lute 16th-Century Tablature - arrangement for chamber orchestra
1972
Concerto "Carpathian" for symphony orchestra
1970
"0:0 v nashu pol'zu" ("0:0 to Our Win"), musical comedy (prod.: Kharkiv, 1970)
1970
Partita no.2 for chamber orchestra
1969
Concerto for violin and symphony orchestra
1969
"Recitatives and Rondeau" for piano trio
1967
"Kamenjari", one-act ballet after I.Franko (prod.: L'viv, 1967)
1966
Partita no.1 for strings
1966
"Iz Dytjachoho al'bomu" ("From the Children's Album"), cycle of (5) pieces for piano
1965
"Gucul's'kyj tryptykh" ("Hutsul Triptych") for symphony orchestra
1964
"Chelovek" ("The Human Being"), cantata on verses by E.Mezhelajtis (in Russian) for soloists, chorus and symphony orchestra
1964
"Burlesque" for piano
1964
"Blues" for piano
1963
Sonata no.1 for violin and piano
1963
"Sil'nee smerti" ("More Strong than Death"), poem for symphony orchestra
1962
Four Romances on verses by T.G.Shevchenko for voice and piano (version: for voice and strings)
1961
Suite for strings
1961
Variations for piano
1960
"Vesna" ("The Spring"), cantata on verses by I.Franko (in Ukrainian) for soloists, chorus and symphony orchestra
1960
"Waltz", poem for symphony orchestra
1959
"U Karpatakh" ("In the Carpathian Mountains"), cycle of pieces for piano
     
"Requiem" for chorus, soloists and orchestra
     
"Album Leaf", nostalgic reverie for solo piano (version: for string quartet)
     
"Carpathian Rhapsody" for clarinet and piano
     
"Melody" for piano solo (versions: for string orchestra and for string quartet)
     
"Three Jazz Pieces" for 4-hands piano

Pieces for variety ensembles.

Songs to theatre plays and to more than 40 films, including "Tini zabutykh predkiv" ("Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors") by producer S.Paradzhanov after Ukrainian writer M.Kotsiubyns'ky.